Misty Morning in Ellesmere

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I took my camera to Ellesmere on the bus, yesterday. There was heavy mist when I arrived, and although the mist slowly cleared a little, the sun stayed hidden and the air was chill. So I came back home after lunch. Despite the weather, I enjoyed my morning pottering around looking for pictures. The lack of easy views encouraged me to seek out subjects I might otherwise have missed. And although there was not a lot of colour, what there was seemed extra vivid. Here are some photos taken in Cremorne Gardens, at the edge of the Mere and in the Castlefields.

 

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13 Responses to “Misty Morning in Ellesmere”

  1. The grey of the sky and the bright colours of the flowers and berries – beautiful! Tho – why did someone chain up that poor rock?’

  2. Some rocks prefer to be tied down. It saves them from having to decide what to do. The are slow thinkers.

  3. What is under the strings of pearl and what are the pearls?

    • suetortoise Says:

      It’s water droplets on a thistle, Liv. Some of the lines are hanging on spider webs, but most of them are just coating the fibres of the thistledown. The mist had made everything very wet in the field – my feet and trouser legs got soaked – and all the webs were decorated with drops of water like this.

  4. It does look as though it would have been a wonderful wander. And yes, that poor rock, all trussed up with rusty iron!

    • suetortoise Says:

      It seemed a happy enough rock. I did like the way the curve of the stone echoed the curves of the lovely oak tree behind it.

  5. Love the mist and spider webs on the thistle. Would be interesting to reinterpret in fibre and beads.

    • suetortoise Says:

      Yes, I thought that thistle might inspire embroidery. I’d love to see the result, if anyone uses it as a starting point for a design.

  6. Christine Barrett Says:

    Very nice. Love the water beads on the thistles.

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